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  • Meditate on the Passion

    “You should make more sacrifices. Meditate on the passion of Jesus” (2nd message).
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I Station Read More
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II Station Read More
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III Station Read More
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VII Station Read More
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Meditate on the Passion

Our Lady’s second message, given in Garabandal on June 18, 1965, ends with these words: “You should make more sacrifices. Meditate on the passion of Jesus.” One of the ways which the Church suggests to meditate on the passion of Our Lord and Savior is to pray the Stations of the Cross. In doing so, we follow Jesus to Calvary and meditate on the suffering which he endured for our salvation.

I Station - Jesus is condemned to death

The Judge of the world, who will come again to judge us all, stands there, dishonoured and defenseless before the earthly judge. Pilate is not utterly evil. He knows that the condemned man is innocent, and he looks for a way to free him. But his heart is divided. And in the end he lets his own position, his own self-interest, prevail over what is right.

Read more: First Station

II Station - Jesus takes up his Cross

The price of justice in this world is suffering: Jesus, the true King, does not reign through violence, but through a love which suffers for us and with us. He takes up the Cross, our cross, the burden of being human, the burden of the world. And so he goes before us and points out to us the way which leads to true life.

Read more: Second station

III Station - Jesus falls for the first time

There is a more profound meaning in this fall...The humility of Jesus is the surmounting of our pride; by his abasement he lifts us up. Let us allow him to lift us up. Let us strip away our sense of self-sufficiency, our false illusions of independence, and learn from him, the One who humbled himself, to discover our true greatness by bending low before God and before our downtrodden brothers and sisters.

Read more: Third station

IV Station - Jesus meets his Mother

She stayed there, with a Mother’s courage, a Mother’s fidelity, a Mother’s goodness, and a faith which did not waver in the hour of darkness: “Blessed is she who believed” (Lk 1:45). “Nevertheless, when the Son of man comes, will he find faith on earth?” (Lk 18:8). Yes, in this moment Jesus knows: he will find faith. In this hour, this is his great consolation.

Read more: Fourth station

V Station - The Cyrenian helps Jesus carry the Cross

Jesus, whose divine love alone can redeem all humanity, wants us to share his Cross so that we can complete what is still lacking in his suffering (cf. Col 1:24). Whenever we show kindness to the suffering, the persecuted and defenceless, and share in their sufferings, we help to carry that same Cross of Jesus. In this way we obtain salvation, and help contribute to the salvation of the world.

Read more: Fifth station

VI Station - Veronica wipes the face of Jesus

At first, Veronica saw only a buffeted and pain-filled face. Yet her act of love impressed the true image of Jesus on her heart: on his human face, bloodied and bruised, she saw the face of God and his goodness, which accompanies us even in our deepest sorrows. Only with the heart can we see Jesus. Only love purifies us and gives us the ability to see. Only love enables us to recognize the God who is love itself.

Read more: Sixth station

VII Station - Jesus falls for the second time

The tradition that Jesus fell three times beneath the weight of the Cross evokes the fall of Adam – the state of fallen humanity – and the mystery of Jesus’ own sharing in our fall. The Lord bears this burden and falls, over and over again, in order to meet us. He gazes on us, he touches our hearts; he falls in order to raise us up.

Read more: Seventh station

VIII Station - Jesus meets the women of Jerusalem who weep for him

Hearing Jesus reproach the women of Jerusalem who follow him and weep for him ought to make us reflect. How should we understand his words? Are they not directed at a piety which is purely sentimental, one which fails to lead to conversion and living faith? It is no use to lament the sufferings of this world if our life goes on as usual. And so the Lord warns us of the danger in which we find ourselves. He shows us both the seriousness of sin and the seriousness of judgement.

Read more: Eighth station